top of page

🎙️HANDLE Your Own Podcast EDITS or Outsource ❓

I am all about evaluating the cost (time, money, aggravation, etc) before starting something. Even if I can't figure it out exactly, having a reasonable idea can prevent wasted effort in the long run.


Unfortunate truth--creating and maintaining a podcast does cost money. It doesn't cost anywhere near what a full time marketer would cost, and there are ways to limit the costs, but there is still a price. (As a side note, guesting on podcasts doesn't cost anything.)


Knowing this, I still think a podcast is a valuable way to build authority and create content at a much lower price than other mediums.


If you have decided a podcast is right for you or your business, it's important to know how you will handle post-production initially and in the long-term.


What is Post-Production?


Post-production is everything that happens after the recording ends up to an including publishing your podcast episode. A very general definition definition of post-production would be audio editing. It can include marketing the episode and doing video editing as well depending on how you want to draw the work chart.


At a minimum, post-production for an audio episode would include:


  • Editing audio for errors

  • Processing audio for best sound

  • Adding intros/outros, or any other segments to the episode

  • Creating the file to upload to the hosting service (the hosting service will distribute it everywhere)

  • Creating a title and show notes for the episode and scheduling it to be published


Should You Outsource Post-Production or Do It Yourself (could also include having your team handle it)?


My answer to this question is the most frustrating answer in the marketing world--it depends. It really does. These are four options to consider for post-production. When I say anything about "you," I am using this in the sense of you or your team. I will include my own story after the list.


  1. Outsource post-production indefinitely and not worry about doing it on your own

  2. Outsource the first few episodes (first 5 to 10) so you can focus on the other parts of the podcast and then learn how to do it

  3. Have someone walk you through how to edit the episode (pay someone to “train” you on it) from the beginning

  4. Figure it out for yourself


Let's look at the pros and cons along with who might be the best fit for each solution.


Outsource post-production indefinitely and not worry about doing it on your own


  • Who should do this: someone who doesn't have the time or desire to learn how to edit.

  • Pros: Easy peasy lemon squeezy. You record and your done.

  • Cons: You pay per episode. Not a deal-breaker if you have budget for it. Can be a challenge if you have little to no budget


Outsource the first few episodes (first 5 to 10) so you can focus on the other parts of the podcast and then learn how to do it


  • Who should do this: someone who doesn't have the time or desire to learn how to edit initially, but wants to control the process long-term

  • Pros: You focus on the process of podcasting (including the preparation and recording) and lay that as a foundation first without having to worry about post-production (limits your upfront challenges). 10 episodes can be manageable from a budget stand-point without having it as a long-term budget item.

  • Cons: You still pay for a limited number of episodes. You also must commit to owning the process down the road.

Have someone walk you through how to edit the episode (pay someone to “train” you on it) from the beginning


  • Who should do this: a person who wants to own the process and may or may not have the technical experience to do it.

  • Pros: You learn from someone who has done it before and can take notes. Once you learn it, there is no outsourcing cost in the future.

  • Cons: You have to learn the technical aspects and you are responsible for all of the edits and publishing.

Figure it out for yourself


  • Who should do this: a person with no budget but plenty of time who wants to own the process going forward.

  • Pros: Least financial cost option in that you are not paying for post-production or training. Lots of materials to read or watch on how to do it and what software to use.

  • Cons: You are on your own. It is the slowest of the options depending on your experience.

My Backstory:


When I launched my first podcast in 2020, I worked with a consultant who helped me set it up, figure out the flow per episode, and then he did post production. It was a 10 episode season and all I did was record the pieces and give him the files. 7 months later, I decided to launch the podcast again and do it for an extended period of time. I did not have the budget to outsource it, so I learned how to do the audio editing and I have handled it ever since. I would not have had any clue what to do for those first 10 episodes had I not handed the files off to an editor just because I was trying to figure out the rest of it.


Post-Production Costs


If you want to outsource post production for audio-only episodes, they run the entire spectrum on price. The least cost options would be on Fiverr or Upwork for $25-$50 per episode and would run upwards of $300+ per episode with the bigger brands/boutiques based on their experience. This article does a good job of describing options and prices.

From my experience, you get what you pay for, but that doesn't mean you look for the most expensive option and assume they are good either. Listen to episodes they have produced and see what they sound like. Pay attention to their customer service and how they interact through email or on a call. Find someone you trust, who is kind, and who does good work.


Now What?


The big questions to ask are do I want to learn how to edit or do I want someone on my team to learn how to edit (if it is a business with a podcast)? Do I have the time to commit to editing/post production on each episode? Same if it is someone on my team? Do I have the budget to outsource post-production?


The more you do post-production, the faster and better you will get. The drawback is it takes doing a bunch of episodes to get traction.

4 views0 comments

Commenti


I commenti sono stati disattivati.
bottom of page